Honorary Blogger Wade Kelly: A Long Time Coming – Excerpt + Giveaway!

Honorary_Blogger_Post

A Long Time Coming

by Wade Kelly

Thank you for having me here on my release day! I am super excited. This book took 14 months to write and another 10 in production. For me, and some avid fans, if feels like forever!

This is one thing I have learned in the business is that nothing happens fast. That would be one point of advice I’d give for writer newbies or up-in-coming authors. Don’t expect anything fast. Now of course, if it comes faster, then it is a bonus. If you write something in 2 months and it is out in another 6, then good on you! But if you don’t sit there expecting that 6-8 month turn-around from start to finish because when it doesn’t happen it can be depressing.

For me, this has been such an exciting release. I put a great deal of work into this book. I thought of writing a series, because I hear readers love series, and why not do one hitting on different points of self-esteem? This book deals in part with labels and bullying through name calling etc. My character RC actually undergoes all kinds of abuse in his past and the reader learns about it gradually. I didn’t want to do overly “Hollywood” about it, but I think that sometimes kids do not just get abused one time, and in one method. I think it’s possible to undergo a number of different things and feel like a magnet for pain. I think people can feel like a black cloud follows them around and everything bad can happen to them, and only them.

RC is that guy. He’s the one who put up with so much crap you may think he’d be a different, more cynical person, but he’s not. He’s withdrawn and cautious, yet with a desire to try again. He holds onto hope. For years and through many bad decisions, RC exists in a simple world of work and solitude until one day he meets Nick.

In this excerpt for the Blogger Girls, RC tells Nick’s mom his real name and why he’s gone by initials for a long time. Since High School. And for Nick… he sees himself in RC’s tale and realizes for the first time how he could have easily been that guy who picked on RC in high school; and his self-examination is a long time coming.

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An Excerpt from Names Can Never Hurt Me

“Are you going to hide up here all night, or are you going to introduce me to your friend?” My mom smiled pleasantly, but I knew she was irked that I hadn’t already introduced him while we were all down in the kitchen. Not officially anyway. She stood in the middle of my room with her hands clasped behind her back. Waiting. If I didn’t do as asked, she’d probably stand there all night. I could comment about her being intrusive, but really, did I need to? I wasn’t bothered.

“Sorry, Mom, this is RC. RC, this is my mom, Cathy Jones.”

RC held out his hand and shook hers. “RC? Is that a nickname or your initials?” Leave it to Mom to broach the very question I had been dying to ask for a while but hadn’t.

He cleared his throat. “Um, they’re my initials, but also a nickname. My full name’s Raffael Charles Coppola, ma’am.” He looked unsettled as he told her.

“Raffael Coppola,” she repeated. “What a great Italian-sounding name.”

“Yes, ma’am. My father was Italian. My mother’s Greek.”

My mom smiled at RC and looked over at me. “I’m going to lie down and read before bed. Try not to be too loud in here.” She turned and walked out.

I knew her comment contained a double meaning of some sort. We weren’t loud before. She left the door open, and I was fine with it. We weren’t doing anything. I turned my attention to the TV and shot someone else. After a couple of minutes, I asked that burning question, “So, why do you go by RC? Raffy’s a pretty cool nickname.”

“That’s not what they called me in school,” he replied very quietly.

I noticed RC had stopped shooting when his character stood motionless and got killed by the advancing enemy soldier, so I looked over at him to see what was wrong. He was staring at the floor, controller limply held in his grasp. “RC?”

“I was a fat kid in school,” he whispered, however it was very quiet in the room after I paused the game so I could hear him well. He wasn’t looking at me. He was looking down, but I highly doubted he was counting carpet fibers. He continued slowly, “Kids weren’t very nice.”

RC sat very still and he didn’t look up. Am I supposed to say something? I didn’t know what was appropriate to say. “Um, yeah, I know. Kids can be mean. I’ve done some really shitty things.”

“Everyone called me Raffael until second grade. My mom liked my full name, and that’s how I got introduced. Then I remember eating a ham sandwich at lunch one day and some kid had just learned that capicola was a type of ham. He started laughing and slapping the table as if he’d heard some funny joke. When another boy asked what he was laughing about, he said my named rhymed with a type of ham. The whole table started laughing, and by the end of the day everyone was calling me Capicola instead of Coppola.”

“That’s not so bad. I like ham.” I tried sounding positive, but it didn’t help.

Without reaction to my comment RC said, “They all laughed and started making pig sounds. I was already fat and ridiculed by some kids, but when those other kids started oinking whenever I walked by, it only amped up the harassment because then almost all of my class was making fun of me. It went on all year. When I returned in third grade, I hoped it would change, but it didn’t. There were less random oinks in class, but I after threw up on the bus one morning the nickname changed from Capicola to Ralph.”

“That’s not bad. We have a neighbor named Ralph. I don’t see how that’s so awful when you could easily derive Ralph from Raffael.”

He looked at me then, and the pain in his eyes was dreadful. “It is when ‘Ralph’ is accompanied with retching sounds. It never stopped. The noises and euphemisms for vomit continued through high school. Kids didn’t oink as much, but they pretended to throw up when they passed me in the halls. I was called Vomit, Yackhead, Pukeface, and Upchuck. Kids asked questions like ‘Did you lose your lunch?’ or ‘Can I toss your cookies?’ I made the mistake of crying in front of someone in fifth grade, and that’s when it solidified into shameful taunting for the rest of my life. No one ever called me Raffy. It was always something derogatory.”

RC looked away. I guess looking at me as I sat there with a stupid dumbfounded expression glued to my face was not helping alleviate his embarrassment of the personal pain he had endured in school. He’d just revealed the truth behind his nickname RC, and I gave no reaction at all. I should have, but I didn’t know what to say at first. I’d been one of those guys. I was the jerk in school who pointed out the flaws in others and laughed when they puked on the bus. I was never as malicious as RC had experienced, but I also knew I was not very different from that now. How often had I judged others in my head, yet without verbal aspersions?

The main reason I hadn’t called RC fat when I first saw him was because Marcy said it. Hearing her cut somebody down made me feel bad. If I’d have done it first, I don’t think I would’ve apologized. I compared people, but I didn’t look at someone and automatically think fat, ugly, poor, Asian, bad hair, needs a bath…. Okay, I did think that with RC. He’d looked scruffy and unkempt and I postulated he needed lessons in proper hygiene. It was only because I didn’t know him. Once I’d found out about the job and the skin issues, it all made total sense. And now, he looked way better.

However, after hearing someone from his past would make him feel so worthless, I was angry. Raffael was his name, not Ralph or Capicola or—for fuck’s sake—Vomit! And Raffy was my friend. I’d never had a friend who had been bullied like that. I had always been the one joining in the torment of others. I never instigated, but I think it was because I feared getting caught. But if someone else started the teasing, I’d had no qualms assisting… back then. I was different now.

It happened in high school. Somewhere between eighth and tenth grade, our little “gang” gelled, and it wasn’t an issue excluding others. We didn’t need to make fun of them or bully them for being ugly or fat. We tended to stick to our own. We were the “pretty people,” as M-L had put it. Others stayed away by default. We became a gang without the hate crimes. We didn’t beat others up or stuff them into lockers. We hung out and partied and drank and had loads of sex and talked about careers and college and the future. Our gang became a stagnant bubble of “senior year” even though most of us had graduated college and found the careers we’d talked about in high school.

So when RC described his past, I couldn’t help but consider it could have easily been me tormenting him. It wasn’t, and it wouldn’t be now, but it could have been. I felt terrible thinking I had it in me to hurt him like that.

I finally worked up my nerve to whisper, “I’m sorry.”

RC straightened and took a deep breath. He stood up and shrugged it off. “If that was the worst thing to ever happen to me, I think I’d be grateful. But the rest is a story for another day.”

“You didn’t need to say all that to me. Not if it’s painful.”

“Yeah, I did.”

“Why?”

“Because it’s like you said three weeks ago… I feel comfortable around you. I know lots of things about you, but we hadn’t gotten around to me yet. I didn’t want to dump it all on you at once, but I felt like I should start with something. After your mom asked my name, it seemed like the right time.”

My heart warmed. “You feel comfortable around me?”

“Yes. It feels like you’re the first friend I ever had. And if you give me shit over it, I’ll pound you.”

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About Names Can Never Hurt Me

iWhat if sexuality wasn’t a definable thing and labels merely got in the way?

Nick Jones can’t remember a time when he wasn’t part of the in crowd. Everywhere he goes, he stands out as the best looking guy in the room, and women practically fall into bed with him. Then, after kissing Corey on a dare led much more and on many occasions, Nick’s “screw anything” reputation escalated, but he didn’t care.

When Nick meets RC at the restaurant where he works, it throws his whole life out of whack. Overweight, always sweaty, gay, and hairy like a bear, RC lives up to his dubbed nickname “Scruffy Dude.” He seems Nick’s complete opposite, but Nick can’t get him out of his head.

Because of peer-pressure and his fears about defining his sexuality, Nick struggles with stepping out of his comfort zone and caring about someone different than himself. If he’s lucky, somewhere between arrogance and ignorance, Nick might find out what it means to be an adult, but if he’s wrong, he could lose everything.

Available at:  Dreamspinner Press

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About Wade Kelly

Wade Kelly lives and writes in conservative, small-town America on the east coast where it is not easy to live free and open in one’s beliefs. She writes passionately about the controversial issues witnessed in real life and strives to make a difference by making people think. Wade does not have a background in writing or philosophy, but still draws from personal experience to ponder contentious subjects on paper. When not writing, she is thinking about writing, and more than likely scribbling ideas on sticky notes in the car while playing “taxi driver” for her three children. She likes snakes, and has a tegu (lizard) living in her bathroom.

You can find out more about Wade’s books on Dreamspinner Press or connect with her through her Website, Blog, Twitter or email her at writerwadekelly@gmail.com.

Blogger_GiveawayWade has graciously offered up a chance to win a $10 gift card to Amazon.com!! The giveaway starts now and ends August 17, 2014 at 11:59 p.m. To enter, just click the link below!

Rafflecopter Giveaway

Please be aware that the only way to enter the giveaway is to click the Rafflecopter link above. Any comments on this post will not count towards entering the giveaway, except to verify your Rafflecopter entry.

Don’t forget to check out Morgan’s review of Names Can Never Hurt Me to see what she thought of it!

Good luck!

Categories: Book Promo, Excerpts, Giveaways, Honorary Blogger Post, LGBT, Published in 2014 | Tags: , , , | 15 Comments

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15 thoughts on “Honorary Blogger Wade Kelly: A Long Time Coming – Excerpt + Giveaway!

  1. Serena S.

    I like the cover and the title is very appealing. Thanks for the giveaway!

  2. Thank you for the chance to win

  3. Ardent Ereader

    Congratulations on the release of Names can never hurt me. I pre-ordered it from DsP and downloaded it this morning, can’t wait to read it!

  4. JenCW

    I love the cover and how it fits with the title. The book sounds great; I put on my wishlist. Thanks for the giveaway!

  5. alishead

    I was RC in the teasing in school. It was increased by always being the new kid. We moved every year for the first 4 years. Thanks for the giveaway.

  6. Cornelia

    Sounds like a good read and interesting topic.

  7. Shirley Ann Speakman

    I enjoyed the excerpt the book sounds really good adding it to my TBR list.

    ShirleyAnn(at)speakman40(dot)freeserve(dot)co(dot)uk

  8. jenf27

    Loved the excerpt and the cover is quite eye catching. Thanks!!

  9. Sarina

    Thank you for the giveaway! I’ll be sure to check out the book.

  10. please count me in

  11. Antonia

    Thanks for the post and the chance to win!

  12. H.B.

    Great post and wonderful excerpt. Thank you for sharing and for the giveaway!

  13. Debra E

    Congratulations on the new release Wade! Looking forward to reading it.

  14. Nicole Millheim

    This sounds really good

  15. Jbst

    The excerpt really tore at my heart at the glimpse of the cruelty and bullying that RC faced.

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