Strokes on a Canvas by H. Lewis-Foster: Exclusive Excerpt!

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Exclusive Excerpt from Strokes on a Canvas

by H. Lewis-Foster

“It’s true I was keeping an eye out for Haynes, but you weren’t mistaken. I was looking at you.”

“You were? Why would you be doing that?”

“It’s quite simple, really. I was…”

Milo opened his mouth to continue, but he seemed to have lost the words he’d planned.

“Let me start from the beginning. My name is Milo Halstead, but I imagine you know that after standing so close to myself and Haynes in the pub.” Milo smiled at Evan with no trace of accusation. “What I doubt you’ll know, as not many people do, is that I’m an artist. Or at least I teach art at St. Swithun’s College. I enjoy my work very much, but when I saw you last night, you rekindled my dream of being a professional artist.”

Evan’s eyes widened in confusion, and Milo chuckled.

“I’m not explaining myself very well, am I? The fact is the Royal Academy is running a competition. It’s open to all and I’d love to enter, but I’ve been at a loss for inspiration. Then I saw you last night, and you have such a fascinating, beautiful face, I knew I’d found the subject for my painting. I didn’t dare approach you in the pub, but when I saw you here in the museum, I thought perhaps fate had intervened and it was meant to be.”

Evan knew he should reply, but he was still reeling from Milo’s compliment. He could believe he might find his face fascinating, with its dodgy nose and dimpled chin, but no one had ever called him beautiful before, not even his own mother. In the absence of any reaction from Evan, Milo hesitantly concluded his speech.

“So I was wondering if you might like to sit for me.”

“Sit for you?”

“I mean model for me. Let me paint you. I’d pay you, of course.”

To say Evan was shocked was an understatement.

“I’m sorry, Mr. Halstead, but I couldn’t do that. I’m afraid I’m not the kind of man who takes off his clothes for money. Not even for an artist such as yourself.”

“My dear man, I do apologize.” It was Milo who now looked taken aback. “That’s not what I was suggesting at all. It wouldn’t be that sort of painting. I may ask you to undo your shirt collar, but that’s as much flesh as I would wish you to show.”

Evan was relieved, but he was still astonished by Milo’s proposal.

“Are you sure you want to paint me?”

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About Strokes on a Canvas

London, 1924. Evan Calver is enjoying a quiet pint, when he notices a man smiling at him across the bar. While the Rose and Crown isn’t that kind of pub, Evan thinks his luck might be in, and he narrowly escapes humiliation when he realises the man is smiling at a friend. Eavesdropping on their conversation, Evan discovers the man is named Milo Halstead and served as an army captain during the war.

When they meet again by chance in the British Museum, artist Milo asks Evan if he would sit for a portrait. Evan is amazed that an upper-class artist wants to paint the son of a miner, and he’s just as surprised when their acquaintance blossoms into friendship. When he discovers that Milo is a man like himself, he hopes that friendship might become more. But as Evan and Milo grow ever closer, can they escape the fears of the past to find their future happiness?

Available at: Amazon

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About H. Lewis-Foster

H. has worked with books for a number of years, and is delighted to finally find herself on the author’s side of the bookshelf. She enjoys writing historical romances, and contemporary stories too, and while her characters travel all over the world, they always have a touch of British humour.

H. has lived in various parts of the UK and currently lives in the north of England, where she’s enjoying city life as much as the beautiful countryside. In her spare time, H. loves going to the cinema and theatre, and her very eclectic tastes range from quirky comedy to ballet and Shakespeare, and pretty much everything in between.

Blog/Website | Twitter

Categories: Book Promo, Excerpts, LGBT, Published in 2019 | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

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